One of the great things about blogging is its immediacy. You can respond to events quickly.

That’s also one of its problems.

Take, for example, this post from Publishing 2.0. The author looks at the Technorati top 100 blogs and draws some conclusions:

There are many implications to this phenomenon, all of them fascinating and deeply disruptive to U.S. West Cost-centric view of the blogosphere:

Blogging is a global phenomenon – duh! (I can�t even read a lot of the blogs that link to Publishing 2.0)

MSN Spaces is kicking MySpace�s butt in Asia

The cross-linking power of these personal blogs makes those of us writing on �professional� topics look like we�re sitting in a very small room

The technology blogs that dominated the early geekosphere my soon be crowded out of the Technorati Top 100

The provincial U.S. view of 2.0 does little to help us understand the globalization of 2.0

Any, or all, of these may be correct. The only problem is that the evidence rapidly turned out not to be there, after all. Several readers start digging around the blogs listed and find some anomalies, before David Sifry from Technorati points out that there was a problem with the system, creating the odd results.

Whoops.

Technorati Tags: blogging, blogs, publishing, technorati