Q&A time, moderated by [AJ Pape](http://www.wearelikeminds.com/alumni/aj-pape/), with [Maz Nadjm](http://www.wearelikeminds.com/alumni/maz-nadjm/), [Charlie Osmond](http://www.wearelikeminds.com/alumni/charlie-osmond/) and [Gemma Went](http://www.wearelikeminds.com/alumni/gemma-went/)
[![Mazi at Like Minds 2010](http://www.onemanandhisblog.com/assets_c/2010/02/IMG_2954 - Version 2-thumb-500x317-1591.jpg)](http://www.onemanandhisblog.com/content/images/2010/02/IMG_2954-Version-2.jpg)
The privacy issues is a big one. Bell suggested that if you use Facebook, your privacy is essentially dead. An earlier questioner pointed out that he doesn’t add business contacts on Facebook, because he keeps getting tagged in naked Facebook photos/videos thanks to his rugby club shenanigans… And, indeed, the reduction in privacy social media brings means that “false faces” – non-transparent ways of dealing with people on social media, are easily exploded. Brand image management is much harder…
But, as Mazi points out, even if you have a personal profile if you are associated with your employer’s brand, you still need to be careful. 
And the issue of control comes up. How do you stop your scientists chatting on social media and blowing your R&D secrets? The answer seems to be “long social media guidelines”, but I have to say, my experience of scientists (I’m married to one) is that they really aren’t keen to share things on social media…
And, as the panel draws to a close, the point is made that we’re in an area where new forms are always emerging. You may move from having a social media “face” to multiple “faces”. Strategy needs to evolve as the tools, media of expression and numbers of touch points expand.